Antioxidants in Food and What They Are Good for

Antioxidants are a necessary part of humans’ diet, as it plays significant part in boosting our health and protecting our organisms from a number of diseases. Still, not all antioxidants are equally good for people and it is important to keep track on how you choose ones and how much of these you consume.

Antioxidants are a necessary part of humans’ diet, as it plays significant part in boosting our health and protecting our organisms from a number of diseases. Still, not all antioxidants are equally good for people and it is important to keep track on how you choose ones and how much of these you consume.

Facts

By definition, antioxidants are natural or human-made substances that are able to either prevent or delay cell damage process in our body. Antioxidants come in numerous examples, like Vitamins A, C and E, beta-carotene and other carotenoids, flavonoids, phenols and polyphenols, lypoic acid, lutein, lycopene, manganese, resveratrol, selenium etc. There are currently hundreds of elements that can act like antioxidants, thus increasing our chances to get enough of those in our diet.

Antioxidants are known for their ability to defend our system from free radicals, which are unstable molecules emerging in a number of situations.

For example, while we are exercising, when food we get converts into energy, if we are exposed to environmental or other contaminants like cigarette smoke or industrial pollutants. Big amount of free radicals in our bodies can result into oxidative stress, which is the process triggering intensive cell damage. Furthermore, oxidative stress is known to have a part in development of certain diseases, like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, cardiovascular conditions, diabetes, cancer, and also eye and age-related issues. Therefore, antioxidants are a necessary part of everyone’s diet indeed, for it significantly assists in delaying these unpleasant health problems.

Currently, the major sources of antioxidants are fruits and vegetables as well as dietary supplements.

News

According to National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, data from which were analyzed back in 2009, concluded that adult Americans get 54 percent of vitamin C, 64 percent of vitamin E, 14 percent of alpha- and beta-carotene, and 11 percent of selenium intake from food supplements.

However, supplements have been proven to cause harm because of danger of overdose of certain antioxidant levels that, in turn, can lead to increased risk of lung and prostate cancer, hemorrhagic strokes, and also interact with some medicines (especially during cancer treatment), thus reducing their positive effect. Still, no negative consequences of consuming antioxidants with fruits and vegetables have been discovered. So, natural sources are now considered to be the most beneficial way to get necessary antioxidant substances.

In 2004, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry published a report from USDA, presenting around a hundred of foods that turned out to be the best antioxidant sources. Among those are small red bean, wild blueberries, red dried kidney beans, pinto beans, cultivated blueberries, cranberries, artichoke hearts, blackberries, prunes, raspberries, strawberries, red apples, pecans, sweet cherries, black plums, russet potatoes, dried black beans, plums, and Gala apples.

It is also important to keep in mind that antioxidants themselves do not automatically resolve existing health issues, especially if a person is predisposed to certain conditions. In more complicated cases food supplements may be even less effective than they usually are.

At the same time, though no full longitude research has yet been conducted, natural antioxidants have shown no harmful effect and also provide decent protection against many diseases that tend to come to us as we age.

 

Google AdWords

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *